The streamer

A streamer will be used to pull the parachute out from its compartment inside
the FFU. The streamer will be attached to the parachute top centre via a rope,
about 1.5m long, which should be enough to minimize the risk of streamer
getting coiled around a possible auto rotating FFU before having the chance
to deploy.
Through testing a suitable streamer size has been decided to be about
0.2x1.8m (see Figure 35). The streamer will feature a pocket (Figure 36) at
the end, this has through testing has been verified to exert more drag than the
regular streamer. At a speed of about 30m/s the regular streamer provided an
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average maximum force of 22N while the one with a pocket provide an
average of 33N. The required force to pull the parachute out was through
testing with a dynamometer proven to be about 5 to 15N in magnitude. The
streamer will be manufactured out of a Heavy Airbag Cloth (HAC) which with
the size given above will have a mass of about 70g.
Figure 35 – Picture of the tested 0.2x1.8 meter streamer.
Figure 36 – Pocket at the end of the streamer.
The concept of using a streamer to pull out the parachute has been proven to
work through the parachute deployment test conducted on May 19 2010,
although the results from these tests have still left room for improvement. The
tests conducted on June 3 2010 showed the concept functioning even better
with the streamer having a pocket at the end.

A streamer is used to pull the parachute out from its compartment inside the FFU. The streamer is attached to the parachute top centre via a Kevlar Shock Cord, about 1.5m long, which should be enough to minimize the risk of streamer getting coiled around a possible auto rotating or tumbling FFU before having the chance to deploy. 

Through testing a suitable streamer size has been decided to be about 0.2x1.8m. The streamer will feature a pocket at the end, this concept has through testing been verified to exert more drag than the regular streamer. At a speed of about 30m/s the regular streamer provided an average maximum force of 22N while the one with a pocket provided an average of 33N.

The required force to pull the parachute out was through testing with a dynamometer proven to be about 5 to 15N in magnitude. The streamer is manufactured out of a Heavy Airbag Cloth (HAC) which with the size given above will have a mass of about 70g. The concept of using a streamer to pull out the parachute has been proven to work through the parachute deployment test conducted on May 19 2010, however the results from these tests show that there is still room left for improvement. The tests conducted on June 3 2010 showed the concept functioning even better with the streamer having a pocket at the end.